Norway’s Statkraft set to begin construction on South America’s largest wind farm

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first_imgNorway’s Statkraft set to begin construction on South America’s largest wind farm FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Statkraft AS is preparing to start work on a 519-MW wind project in northeastern Brazil, after signing a turbine supply contract with Nordex SE.The Ventos de Santa Eugenia wind project will consist of 10 wind farms with a total of 91 turbines in the state of Bahia. It is estimated to cost 4.2 billion Norwegian kroner, according to an Oct. 12 company new release.Once online, the project is expected to produce 2.3 TWh of renewable energy yearly, enough to cover the power demand of 1.17 million homes.Statkraft said it will be its largest wind project in South America and will more than double its renewable energy capacity in Brazil.Construction of Ventos de Santa Eugenia is scheduled to begin in January 2021, with a target completion date in June 2023. The first wind turbines are expected to start operation in September 2022.“The construction of Ventos de Santa Eugenia represents a significant step on the way to reaching the goal of developing 6 GW of wind power globally by 2025 and fulfill our ambition to become a leading renewable energy company in the world,” said Jürgen Tzschoppe, executive vice president for international power at Statkraft.[Selene Balasta]More ($): Statkraft ready to build 519-MW wind park in Brazil after signing turbine deallast_img read more

“Whatever you do to the land will come back to you.”

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first_imgI’m really grateful to have Greg Balkan, who was the co-producer on this. He’s a filmmaker by trade, and I really helped with the film and the narratives. It was one of the first monuments President Trump rescinded in December 2017. At the same time, a similar situation was happening in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It was being looked at for oil and gas development. When it comes to ecosystems, like on this continent and in this place, indigenous people have been thinking this way and acting upon it for a long time. Just we don’t have the levers of power to control these areas anymore, truly speaking. “If they open the refuge, I’m gone,” said filmmaker Dr. Len Necefer, a Navajo, to his boss at the Department of Energy after hearing that the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and Bears Ears National Monument were at risk of being opened for drilling. In late 2017, Necefer quit his job and went straight to Salt Lake City to protest the signing of the Bears Ears Reduction. The battle was far from over and his efforts did not stop there. Photo by: Greg Balkin Necefer and Greg Balkan, a filmmaker as well, teamed up to co-produce a film to showcase the symbiotic co-existence of the people and the land in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. This powerful film shares a message that, if ignored, could destroy a vitally important American landscape. If we look at ecosystems, you can’t really just draw a line on the map and say, “okay, the ecosystem ends here and that town starts here” It’s a human-made barrier. Ecologically speaking, borders are meaningless. I’m working on an adventure climbing film on these four sacred mountains of the Navajos, they are pretty rugged and about 14,000 feet. I want it to have a similar thread with connections to land and landscape while also appealing to a climbing audience. Photo by: Keri Oberly – Berry picking with Jessica and her daughters Angelina and Areana and Anette Gilbert. That connection was there in my mind, but another was what brought me into the outdoor scene and filmmaking in the first place. Bears Ears National Monument and the work being done around that. Five tribes came together and proposed protecting an area of about 1.5 million acres in southeast Utah. There were over 100,000 known archaeological sites dating back at least 14,000 years. Right at the end of Obama’s term, President Obama designated the monument. Photo by: Keri Oberly – Photos of Wanda at her camp at Midway Lake getting traditional medicine from the land, Labradore tea. To be completely honest, I feel cringey when I’m referred to as an activist or have activism as part of my work. Largely because what I’m doing, and many others are doing, is fighting for our identity. It’s not something we can just choose to do or not do. I feel activists choose to fight, I feel I don’t have a choice. Necefer is passionate in his fight for environmental and human rights because to him, it’s more than that. He’s fighting for his identity. They have a similar language to the Navajo. So we share a common language, more like a common ancestor language. At the end of the day, what’s really important to remember is that culturally and linguistically, we’re pretty closely related. Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee from Wondercamp on Vimeo. What have been the highs and lows of this filmmaking journey for you? I worked for the Department of Energy for a couple of years. I was looking at how cultural and social values influence energy policy and how those could be incorporated into the technical decision tools. So basically looking at how culture and social values can play nicely with economics. I did that study on my own community but in the space of how we make decisions and are influenced by where we come from in the values that we were raised. My department worked with a lot of Alaska Native communities, including the one featured in the film, and I heavily related to the people and their culture. Necefer is currently a professor at the University of Arizona doing research and teaching scenario studies in natural resources policy. He looks at issues involving energy, the environment, and indigenous peoples. Necefer is also the owner of an outdoor apparel company, NativeOutdoors, a sponsor of the film. Photo by: Keri Oberly – Hunting caribou with Gregory Gilbert and Raymond. They got 3 caribou. So much advocacy around protecting the Arctic Refuge has been on the mountain animals, but not so much the people that have the steward of these landscapes. The Arctic Refuge exists in the state that it does because of the people that live there take care of it and have been for so long. The Arctic Refuge is an incredibly pristine environment, there are over 200 birds there that go to five different continents. That little piece of the Arctic Refuge is connected to most of the world’s, simply because of the birds that nest there. The larger impact would be on other areas because it’s such an interconnected web. I think what I feel most proud of is being able to support a community that I share so much in common with while being able to connect my story and this story, to the larger story of this country and to connect with people who care about these issues. Photo by: Keri Oberly – The Indigenous Solidarity Event hosted by the Gwich’in Steering Committee. There was a roundtable with Raul Grijalva of Arizona. Then a press conference with Ruben Gallego, Don Beyer, Jared Huffman, and Deb Haaland showed up all to stand with the Gwich’in Nation in solidarity in protecting the Porcupine Caribou Herd. Film Website: https://www.gwichyaazhee.us Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee, presented by The Wilderness Society and Patagonia, illustrates the current administration’s plans to reduce protected public lands for oil and gas leases in the ANWR. The Gwich’in, a native people who live just north of the Arctic Circle, are fighting to protect the lands and native caribou from the environmental disruption of energy development. For the Gwich’in, who rely on resources from the land, this is a story of food security and survival. The impact of opening the refuge is more than just on Gwichyaa Zhee. How would you describe the greater impact and what it means for humankind? Len Necefer In my mind, the two stories aren’t that different from each other. The bottom line is that indigenous people need to fight for their identity and land. center_img These ecosystems are intertwined into larger fabrics of worlds, and something I recognized with the Gwich’in people, and the five tribes down here, is that we are protecting our little piece of the puzzle so that the puzzle stays intact. We’re just doing our part. Photo by: Greg Balkin Necefer saw striking similarities between the energy and mining exploitation in Bears Ears National Monument, Grand Staircase-Escalante, and ANWR. As the government steadily strips protection from public lands, more and more communities are threatened. By highlighting the commonalities of these struggles, the filmmakers hope to inspire viewers to stand with the Gwich’in, fight for the Arctic, and consider how our own backyard might one day be in jeopardy, too. It was a lot of hard work working in Native communities because we were so interested to care for it. That’s kind of been an important learning process. For me, as an indigenous person, I also have to be aware of the dynamics as well, because this is not my community. It wasn’t necessarily a struggle, but more an opportunity for growth and learning. I always think, “imagine what that would look like if that sort of understanding and thinking was in policy. What would our country’s environmental laws or policies look like if that was the base level of understanding?” Photo by: Keri Oberly We had the chance to ask Len Necefer a few questions about Welcome to Gwichyaa Zhee. Something I try to fall back on in motivating action is that these places where we’re living today have been stewarded for thousands and thousands of years. Now, do we want to screw it up in the span of 100 years? The same factors that cause ecosystems to die are also the same factors that cause languages and cultures to die. A big highlight has been seeing the interest there has been on this particular issue, especially from younger folks. It’s very hard to explain why the refuge matters without the sort of context of how much people depend on landscapes there. To see people’s reactions when the light bulb clicks like, “okay, I get it. I get why this matters.” That’s been really amazing. Indigenous people are less than 5% of the world’s population, but over 80% of the world’s biodiversity exists on the land that indigenous people live on. Our identities and everything about who we are is tied to the land around us. If you think about it, it’s like protecting your family. Taking care of your family is like taking care of everything around you. At the end of the day, technology is not going to save us. My connections with nature are largely in part with my identity and my family’s history with the land. I feel most connected to Saile, Arizona and especially Canyon De Chelly, where my family’s clan has a history dating back to 1200ad. We are entrusted to take care of it and the land. What are the biggest takeaways you aim for the viewers of your film to gain?   Are you planning/working on any future environmental films at the moment? I do a lot of adventure rock climbing and skiing out here in Arizona kind of on the side of my work. I think one of the big pieces that I hope people take away is the human story of the Arctic Refuge. I feel in media and culture there’s this kind of portrayal of us that is kind of rugged and people living off the land really harshly. I don’t think it’s a disservice to be portrayed that way, but I think humanizing the Arctic refugees should be the big takeaway. I want folks to know, people have been living there for 40,000 years or more. There’s an environmental issue happening, but there’s also a very real human right issue occurring there as well. Tell us about yourself and your connection to nature. What was your life like before you devoted it to filmmaking and environmental activism? Photo by: Greg Balkin Photo by Greg Balkin of Len Necefer in Gwichyaa Zhee One of my favorite moments of your film was when you quoted your grandfather and said, “Whatever you do to the land will come back to you.” This can be applied to all of today’s environmental issues. Would you like to elaborate on this? What inspired you to make a film about this particular area?  Photo by: Greg Balkin Photo by: Keri Oberly – Gideon James draws on a drum he built out of caribou skin at his home in Arctic Village, AK. New mini-documentary highlights the indigenous fight to protect ANWR. Photo by Keri Oberly About Dr. Necefer:https://ais.arizona.edu/users/len-neceferlast_img read more

Top nine questions about executive compensation and COVID-19

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first_imgLike many of you, I’ve learned a lot about myself during the stay-at-home order. Some good, some bad. It turns out that I am an excellent hunter-gatherer of scarce paper goods. And, I’m good at making pancakes. On the flipside, I am terrible at prioritizing my home chores. Put away boxes after moving six years ago – nope! Take the Roomba out of the box – too busy! Learn about non-avian dinosaur paleobiology – yes please!Thankfully credit unions have a guiding principle in navigating COVID-19 to help them prioritize amid the chaos, “people helping people.” As much as I love talking about executive compensation, it’s not the main focus right now. However, our current environment is an opportune time to evaluate your executive retention program. Eventually we’ll be back to our usual day-to-day activities, and retention of your tested high performers will be critical. In other words, your competitors will be eager to recruit your proven – and subsequently highly marketable – executives to steer them through the next challenge.My colleague Dan Mayfield, Managing Director of Gallagher’s Human Resources & Compensation Consulting practice, shares answers to nine common questions he is receiving from clients about executive compensation administration during this uncertain time. One piece of advice Dan offers is to maintain as much discipline as possible as compensation decisions during this stressful time could set a precedent for future challenges. In addition to retention questions, Dan addresses succession planning and perquisites. I recommend you check out Dan’s action items to identify any gaps in your current program.You can access the Top Nine Questions Asked about Executive Compensation and COVID-19 here »I hope that during this crazy time, you’ve found something you’re good at. In case you were wondering, I’m halfway through my 12-week dinosaur class! 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Liz Santos As Chief of Staff for the Executive Benefits practice, Liz supports the teams that design and service client benefit plans. Formerly BFB, Gallagher Executive Benefits consults with organizations on securing … Web: www.GallagherExecBen.com Detailslast_img read more

What ransomware reveals about our cybersecurity strategy

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first_imgRansomware is here to stay.  Worse yet, the blind-spot in your cybersecurity, leveraged by Ransomware may lead to damage well beyond “simple payoffs.”Imagine logging in to your network to find this message: “All of your files have been encrypted. You have 72 hours to obtain a secret key to unlock your files, or else they will remain locked forever. The price to obtain the key is $100,000 worth of Bitcoin.” Worse yet, what if the bad actor was threatening to destroy your back-ups, having already encrypted your files?Unlikely to happen to your organization, you say. Think again. More and more, Ransomware is succeeding at fleecing companies across the nation and around the world, including banks and credit unions. Just last month, the Bankers Electronic Crimes Task Force joined with the State Bank Regulators and the U.S. Secret Service to publish a “Ransomware Self-Assessment Tool” meant to guide you toward better security practices to reduce the threat posed by Ransomware. They use the word “protect” often, but I see more “mitigation” than I do “protection” when reading through it. And I wonder why our collective thinking, here and elsewhere, continues on the path of “monitor and mitigate” in the face of Ransomware’s growth and success. According to cybersecurity experts such as CyberTheory’s Steve King, it’s “a classic 2020 Cybersecurity nightmare: We know what’s going on, but we can’t stop it.” Worse yet, people working to change how the industry approaches the endpoint security challenge, point out how Ransomware’s success REVEALS THE BLINDSPOT and the weakness in our cybersecurity efforts.What is that weakness, and what might it cost us?  Our collective acceptance that we can’t stop this from happening, that we can only mitigate loss by cleaning up and paying up after the damage is done is the weakness we’ve accepted. This failure to address the challenge directly, to work to render malicious software benign, not just “patch and backup”, has left us all vulnerable to existential threats to our organizations and our brands, not just demands for ransom.What is this thing we choose to minimize rather than stop?  Traditionally, Ransomware has been malicious software designed to encrypt the victim’s data storage drives, rendering them inaccessible to the owner. An ultimatum is then delivered, demanding payment in return for the encryption key. If the ransom demand isn’t met, the key will be deleted, and the data lost forever. Current guidance focuses on backing up data and keeping it clear of external access, then using it when successfully attacked; but too few do this or can afford to do this.  More importantly, paying off the bad guys or restoring systems and data, while mitigating the immediate disaster, hasn’t solved for the systemic BLINDSPOT in Cybersecurity practice. I wrote “traditionally” above because, as Steve King recently wrote “Ransomware continues to dominate the news and has become a major business risk. It’s not your granddaddy’s Ransomware either. Threat actors have become more sophisticated. No more opportunistic or shotgun attacks on non-specific targets. Now we see lengthy reconnaissance. Currently, the average time from the first evidence to deployment is 3 days. The global average dwell-time is 56 days.”He goes on to explain that these bad actors are collecting tons of useful network topology (e.g., ingress and egress points such as compromised web servers), backup sources and destinations, crown jewel assets, and administration (e.g., KRBTGT, ADFS, Microsoft 365) targets. And he points out that many times, these access points are productized and made available for sale on the dark web, saving the modern attacker a lot of work. He refers to how “back in the day, attackers were simply encrypting an OS and network files. Now, we’re seeing them exfiltrate key data and destroy backups before the encryption takes place.” He rightly points out that this is much more impactful and increases the likelihood that the ransom gets paid. And now it’s “pay me twice, first for decryption capabilities, and second to return or destroy the stolen data. If not, public excerpts happen.”  Clearly, these guys have gotten really good at being bad! And they can do even more damage once they have breached your system, often hiding from your “detection” efforts in order to do more than just demand ransom.Just a matter of time. You may not yet have been targeted by Ransomware, but many large, medium and small financial institutions have; and because your cybersecurity tools and methods do a poor job addressing the threat of Ransomware it’s not unkind to write “it’s just a matter of time.”  So, what should we be doing?There are ways to mitigate the risks of ransomware (but are they good enough?). We are told to worry, a lot, and we are presented with a laundry list of policies and tasks to bring to bear on the problem. For instance, the FBI, U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team and the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council put out guidance and best practices on how to help protect your systems from this growing threat. Some of the basic defenses against ransomware they prescribed include:Educating all staff on the risks and how to safely use email and the web;Making sure to regularly back-up critical systems and data;Maintaining up-to-date firewalls and anti-malware systems and protections;Limiting the ability of users or IT systems to write onto servers or other systems;Having a robust patch-management program;Using web- and email-protection systems and software; andRemoving any device suspected of being infected from your systems.While good and necessary, none of the above prevent the most pernicious forms of malware delivering today’s Ransomware. All of the above tasks are part of the standard methodology and prescribed practices to limit the access of unauthorized users and software to your systems. They are all good things to do. They all reduce risk, and show you are working hard to address your cybersecurity responsibilities but, unfortunately, they aren’t enough. WHY NOT? Because, as I’ve come to learn, the best Anti-virus/Endpoint Detection software on the market today, and the best monitoring and detection tools and processes, and the best mitigation and recovery tasks all have a critical blind-spot — they all fail to see what is happening INSIDE OF APPLICATIONS, which is where the majority of today’s successful security attacks are occurring including Ransomware attacks (which do their designed damage before detection and mitigation can make any impact). According to TJ Tajalli, CEO of OnSystem Logic, “what you’re using today, regardless of the vendor you’ve chosen, while absolutely necessary, is unfortunately also absolutely insufficient, tragically insufficient, in the face of today’s next-gen Ransomware because its defenses are built based only on AI, signatures, and behavioral data of previously seen attacks.” Mr. Tajalli goes on to suggest that “we must stop accepting the idea that even the most sophisticated endpoint security products are incapable of PREVENTING attacks in the first place.” He points out that “clicking on one email by an employee should never put a company in a position to have the type of disruption we see happening today.” And he laments that the news stories regarding Ransomware attacks and the payoffs or expensive mitigation efforts are not “success stories” but, rather, reminders of how “customers have been trained to accept that attacks will succeed but if they can afford to pay big dollars after an attack has succeeded, there are companies out there, including those that built their endpoint security product in the first place, that may be able to clean up the mess for them.”So, what can we do? Well, it’s time to learn about and start adding endpoint prevention solutions that stop malicious software from running and delivering attacks such as Ransomware. Bad/misbehaving software can get on the endpoint any number of ways (which is why we receive so much advice about patching, training and monitoring). It could arrive via phishing attacks, credential stealing, pictures, links, or other data files containing its bad payload, malicious Microsoft Office macros, or any other method.  But what is important, is to make sure that bad/misbehaving software CANNOT execute its damaging instructions, including Ransomware, no matter how hard it tries. It’s time to demand answers to this problem. It’s time for the market to provide solutions.  Monitoring and mitigation are not prevention. It’s time to act on that knowledge. 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Greg Crandell Greg Crandell provides strategy, market planning, business development, and management consulting to financial technology firms and their clients – Credit Unions and Banks. For more years than he wishes to admit, … Web: queryconsultinggroup.com Detailslast_img read more

Pennsylvania Stands United Against Elder Abuse

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first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 15, 2017 Pennsylvania Stands United Against Elder Abusecenter_img Press Release,  Seniors Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Wolf’s cabinet secretaries stood with advocates in the state Capitol Rotunda in support of World Elder Abuse Awareness Day.Secretary of Aging Teresa Osborne, Secretary of Banking and Securities Robin Wiessmann, Pennsylvania State Police Lieutenant Colonel Stephen A. Bucar, Co-Chair of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s Advisory Council on Elder Justice Zygmont Pines, and the Attorney General’s Director of Elder Protection Unit David Shallcross gathered to demonstrate unity against elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation.“One of the most important jobs of government is protecting older Pennsylvanians,” Governor Wolf said. “I am proud that my administration stands united against elder abuse and is working tirelessly to ensure seniors are protected and supported across the commonwealth.”“Elder abuse is an issue that impacts the health and human rights of older Pennsylvanians and seniors around the globe,” said Secretary of Aging Teresa Osborne. “We all have a stake in this matter, and a world free of elder abuse can only be realized when we choose to recognize and report it.”Abuse can take many forms, including physical, sexual, emotional, financial, and can be a result of abandonment, caregiver neglect, or self-neglect. Signs of abuse can include unexplained bruises, burns or broken bones, lack of basic hygiene, access to adequate food, clean or appropriate clothing, unexplained weight loss, social isolation, changes in banking habits, or giving away assets without an apparent reason.In fiscal year 2015-16, over 34,500 reports of suspected abuse were received. Of those reports, over 24,00 were for adults 60 years of age or older, which represents an increase of 21.3% from the previous year. As the senior population and the number of abuse reports increases, the state faces the challenge of meeting the rising demand for protective services and has been working collaboratively to address the issue.“We are very concerned about an abuse of our senior citizens that often goes unreported: elder financial abuse. Make no mistake: financial fraud committed against senior citizens is a form of elder abuse,” said Secretary of Banking and Securities Robin L. Wiessmann. “Together with our partners in the public and private sectors, we are working to help ensure that senior citizens can enjoy their retirement years with a basic sense of financial security.”In addition to working with the Department of Banking and Securities, the Department of Aging has been collaborating with Pennsylvania State Police, the Office of the Attorney General, and the Pennsylvania Supreme Court Advisory Council on Elder Justice to increase coordination and training on elder abuse.“The Pennsylvania State Police continues to work closely with our local, state, and federal law enforcement partners to fight elder abuse in all of its forms,” said Lieutenant Colonel Stephen A. Bucar. “We also ask all Pennsylvanians to join us by reaching out to their vulnerable neighbors, friends, and family members. Victims of elder abuse are often isolated. By regularly checking in with the older adults in our lives, we can better identify and report signs of abuse.”If you suspect elder abuse, report it by calling the 24-hour statewide abuse hotline at 1-800-490-8505. Pennsylvania law protects those who report suspected abuse from retaliation and civil or criminal liability; all calls are free and confidential.World Elder Abuse Awareness Day is observed annually, on June 15, as the day for the entire world to focus its’ attention on protecting and preventing seniors from abuse.For information on the Department of Aging, visit www.aging.pa.gov. For information on the Department of Banking and Securities, visit www.dobs.pa.gov. For information on the Pennsylvania State Police, visit www.psp.pa.gov.last_img read more

Holladay scores second straight at West Liberty

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first_imgBy Jerry MackeyWEST LIBERTY, Iowa (May 7) – Chad Holladay scored his second consecutive iWireless IMCA Late Model feature win in a caution-free 25-lap main event Saturday at West Liberty Raceway.Veteran Ron Boyse led the first few circuits before Holladay made his move into the lead using the high line off turn four. Boyse ran a very strong second, crossing under the checkers ahead of Nick Marolf.The Performance Concepts IMCA Modifieds saw Chris Zogg work his way to the front from a fourth row start, setting up a battle for the lead with Andrew Schroeder. The two frontrunners swapped the lead several times using the slide jobs to perfection.Zogg was able to secure the lead for good on lap 15 en route to the 20-lap win. Schroeder ran second ahead of Jerry Luloff.The Weikert Iron & Metal IMCA Northern SportMods saw great racing for the lead between even­tual winner Logan Anderson and Cody Harris. Anderson took the lead coming to the white flag and held off Harris for a car length win. Colton Livesy came across the finish line in third.David Brandies broke out of a pack early on in the 15 lap Kile Motorsports IMCA Stock Car main and went on to win the caution-free main event. Johnny Spaw battled his way to the front and set­tled for second ahead of Greg Gill.The US 6 Bodyworks IMCA Sport Compact feature win went to Cody VanDusen, who was able to hold off Jacob Smith at the finish of the 10 lap main event.Racing will continue on Saturday, May 14th with the Lil’ Racer Car Club holding its annual world’s largest candy scramble. The club will be out to break the 2015 record of 714 pounds of candy.last_img read more

Bale benefits as bite ban hits Suarez

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first_img Dunn told Press Association Sport: “There is no doubting the incredible talent of Luis Suarez, and I think at one point a lot of our members believed that his behaviour was improving, and for that reason, several seemed prepared to vote for him. However, the biting incident changed all of that. “In the end nearly every writer apart from two found it impossible to give our award to someone who had just been banned for 10 games by the Football Association for biting an opponent. “Some people have the view that the receipt of a prestigious award can have redemptive powers, that it can make players realise they have responsibilities – clearly the two who voted for Suarez must think along those lines.” Bale’s 24 goals in all competitions helped take Andre Villas-Boas’ men into the quarter-finals of the Europa League and kept them in the race to secure a return to the Champions League via a top-four finish in the Barclays Premier League. Dunn added: “The Bale debate about diving is a valid one, and of course we as football writers are not moral guardians. The issue of simulation has not been overlooked by our members – it is clear the majority believe Gareth is either more sinned against than sinner or that he has taken steps to address the issue himself, or both.” Bale added: “It is a huge honour to receive the Footballer of the Year award from the Football Writers’ Association. It means a lot to win this award when you consider the number of players that have been outstanding for their clubs in the Barclays Premier League this season. “I have been very fortunate to be playing in such a fantastic team and I owe a lot to my team-mates and, obviously, the manager who has shown such faith in me. This award has been won in the past by some of the greatest names in football and I consider it a privilege that the FWA has selected me to be named alongside them.” Tottenham winger Gareth Bale landed the award, topping the poll of journalists with 53% to claim a narrow victory over Manchester United forward Robin van Persie, who was last year’s recipient when at Arsenal. Suarez had also made the PFA shortlist but failed to figure in the top three, with Chelsea midfielder Juan Mata third. FWA chairman Andy Dunn, chief sports writer for the Sunday Mirror, revealed any realistic chance of that happening disappeared when he bit Chelsea’s Branislav Ivanovic. Luis Suarez’s 10-match ban for biting cost him a chance of becoming the Football Writers’ Association’s Footballer of the Year.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

English and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has decided to postpones series

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first_imgLondon: The English and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) has decided to postpone England’s tour of Sri Lanka in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak.“Due to the Covid-19 pandemic worsening globally, and after discussions with Sri Lanka Cricket, we have today made the decision to return our players to the UK and postpone the forthcoming Test series between Sri Lanka and England. “At this time, the physical and mental wellbeing of our players and support teams is paramount. We will now look to bring them home to their families as soon as possible. These are completely unprecedented times, and decisions like this go beyond cricket. England was playing Sri Lanka President’s XI in a 4-day match at the P. Sara Oval in Colombo when the decision was made. IANSAlso Read: Australia women’s upcoming tour to South Africa postponedAlso watch: Senior Journalist Ajit Kumar Bhuyan files nomination papers for Rajya Sabha electionslast_img read more

UFC fighter Jacare Souza tests coronavirus positive

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first_imgFLORIDA: UFC has withdrawn about from Saturday’s card in Jacksonville after middleweight Jacare Souza and two of his cornermen tested positive for the coronavirus, the mixed martial arts promotion said.Brazilian-born Souza was supposed to fight American Uriah Hall at UFC 249, which was originally scheduled for April 18 in New York but postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak. “UFC’s medical team examined Souza and his two cornermen and found them to be currently asymptomatic, or not exhibiting the common symptoms of COVID-19,” UFC said in a statement. “All three men have left the host hotel and will be self-isolating off premises, where UFC’s medical team will monitor their conditions remotely and will provide assistance with any necessary treatment.” AgenciesAlso Read: None more unbeatable than Novak Djokovic at his best: Todd Martinlast_img read more

IKD Caribbean Cup thrills hundreds at CASH

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first_img… Tournament concludes todayTHE International Karate Diagaku’s Caribbean Cup got going yesterday at the Cliff Anderson Sports Hall (CASH), thrilling the hundreds who attended.The two-day event which wraps up today in Georgetown will see over 200 athletes from Antigua, Barbados, Grenada, Jamaica, St Vincent and the Grenadines, St Lucia, Suriname, Trinidad and Venezuela.The youngsters were not left out of the action. (Adrian Narine photos)Vice-Chairman/Vice-Chief Instructor of the Guyana Karate College, Sensei Jeffrey Wong contended that as a host, Guyana is ready for the event.Of those 200, 107 are Guyanese athletes, combined from the KFC and ASKG colleges.In unofficial results seen by Chronicle Sport, there was a gold medal for Guyana in the 17-19 female GKC in the kata and silver in the Bunkai.There were also gold medals in the seniors’ Over-50 for both kata and bunkai and gold for Guyana’s Aliyah Wong in the individual kataAdmission to the event is $500 and today’s event begins at 09:00hrs.last_img read more